Sandy discusses light values in her drawing, and how the values will determine her approach to to working on a particular subject.

Sandy discusses light values in her drawing, and how the values will determine her approach to to working on a particular subject.

Sandy demonstrates working from a photo she took, and the painting it inspired. She often uses photos as source material for a painting.

Sandy demonstrates working from a photo she took, and the painting it inspired. She often uses photos as source material for a painting.

Sandy is starting her first pour on a painting on Tuesday evening. In her studio, she often works on several paintings simultaneously. The painting must be thoroughly dry before any subsequent pours.

Sandy is starting her first pour on a painting on Tuesday evening. In her studio, she often works on several paintings simultaneously. The painting must be thoroughly dry before any subsequent pours.

Sandy used this painting in progress as an example of one of the steps in the pouring paint process.

Sandy used this painting in progress as an example of one of the steps in the pouring paint process.

A sample of a completed work by Sandy Kinnamon. The colors are obtained by the pouring paint method she demonstrated during her presentation.

A sample of a completed work by Sandy Kinnamon. The colors are obtained by the pouring paint method she demonstrated during her presentation.

Sandy shows a work that she has completed using the pouring paint technique she demonstrated for the F.A.A. members.

Sandy shows a work that she has completed using the pouring paint technique she demonstrated for the F.A.A. members.

F.A.A. held its monthly meeting on Tuesday evening, November 3rd. The speaker was F.A.A. President Sandy Kinnamon of Enon, Ohio. She is a signature member of American Watercolor Society, both the Pennsylvania and Ohio Watercolor Societies, the National Society of Painters in Casein and Acrylics. In addition, she has received her ATM-Gold from Toastmasters International. Sandy is an artist, travel teacher, demonstrator, and author of two watercolor books, and has been published in a number of art and craft magazines. She particularly fond of travel teaching. “I love to travel and try to incorporate my travels in my paintings. Many of my adventures yield amazing rich ideas that inevitably become a painting”.

For her demonstration, Sandy showed the members techniques for pouring watercolors. It is a fun method of painting and can yield beautiful mingled colors as a result. She starts with a value study, proceeding from the lightest values to darkest. She uses 140# cold press Arches paper for her work. Her initial steps are to: 1. stretch the paper; 2. mount it on a board; 3. mask the appropriate areas.

When preparing to pour, the artist must first consider how the paint will flow on the paper. Sandy works with primary colors. Her advice: make the paint as smooth as possible – no lumps. For light values, a higher ratio of water to paint is needed, for darker values, more paint and less water. Wet the entire paper, the water will facilitate the flow of the paint. If the paint is too dark, a spray bottle can be used to lighten the paint. Sandy frequently works on multiple paintings in her studio simultaneously. Thoroughly dry the painting before a second pour. She said: “make it up as you go; there is no set directions or rules”. ¬†For a finished work, she usually does 3 – 4 pours. Her goal: to strive for the “charmingly incorrect” in a completed work.